BRITISH WW1 PATT 1913 BAYONET FOR THE PATT 14 ENFIELD RIFLE BY REMINGTON

  • BRITISH WW1 PATT 1913 BAYONET FOR THE PATT 14 ENFIELD RIFLE BY REMINGTON EW425

    BRITISH WW1 PATT 1913 BAYONET FOR THE PATT 14 ENFIELD RIFLE BY REMINGTON

    HISTORY

    The British Rifle, .303 Pattern 1914, was developed from the experimental Pattern 1913 Enfield, originally intended to replace the S.M.L.E. as the standard issue rifle for British Troops. During the Second Boer War, the British Army had been faced with expert Boer marksmen equipped with the Mauser Model 1895, in 7×57mm caliber. This led them to develop a similar rimless cartridge and a Mauser action based rifle to shoot it, the first version being developed in 1911. This went through several revisions until the 1913 Enfield was developed and put into trials. A bayonet based on the P-1907 bayonet was developed at this time as well, and was known as the Patt 1913.

    The outbreak of World War 1 then stopped the development in its tracks, as introduction of a new rifle cartridge during Wartime would have been a logistical nightmare, and there was no time to set up mass production to be ready for the war. The Pattern 1913 was then redesigned to take the standard rimmed .303 British Cartridge, and became the Pattern 1914 Enfield. However, the primary contractor Vickers was only able to make a handful of the rifles, so the rifle was almost an afterthought. The SMLE was retained as the standard issue rifle through WW1, WW2, and beyond.

    There was however still much need of additional rifles and second line weapons for the war, so Britain contracted with U.S. Manufacturers Winchester, Remington and Eddystone to manufacture the Patt 1914. Tooling and production delays led to the first Patt 14 being accepted in February 1916, and they were never received in large quantities. They were mostly used as Sniper rifles, having been found to be more accurate than the SMLE Rifles.

    One the United States entered into WW1, production of the Patt 14 had ceased, and the same three companies modified the Patt 14 to use the .30-06 cartridge, making the Model 1917 Enfield, which was issued along with the 1903 Springfield Rifle, and eventually surpassed it in production during the war. The bayonet for the M1917 is identical to the Patt 14, with markings being the only difference. They were made in the same factories by the same people.

    ITEM DESCRIPTION

    Rarer Remington bayonet. Clean blade correct scabbard with Green painted fittings and round frog stud. British issue marks as shown in the images. Issue date stamps for November 1915.

    $285.00